Photos from the Farm – A muddy Autumn

Barley Seeds ready for planting

A photographic update from Kestle Farm, highlighting once again the terrible weather conditions that we’re facing, along with many other farmers across the UK, Europe and the US. We were hoping for a drier Autumn but it hasn’t happened and the deluge of rain has continued, making it tough for planting new crops. A hard year for everyone.

Fertilizer ready to go but we’re unable to plant anything due to poor conditions

and here’s the conditions we’re up against…Mud!! Not good for planting anything…

Richard Lobb out feeding the ewes. Lambing is due to start soon…

Cattle are currently being kept inside due to adverse conditions, the rain has been pretty relentless

Richard out in the jeep checking up on things under a very dark sky!

on the upside, the savoys growing out in the veg field are looking pretty good!

lovely colours in the veg field, sprouts, kale & savoys amongst others

the cold wet conditions have hit the swede crop hard, lots of poor specimins

Richard out checking up on things in the veg field. Usually a lovely view from here today it has disappeared in the drizzle

Beautiful french partridge have been reared on the farm

here’s Ian Lobb, leading a group of students out in the field. The weather’s never to bad for education!

A poor harvest

 

Have a look at the above photo. Look at the difference between the 2011 harvest and the 2012 harvest of wheat. See the difference in colour, size, texture and overall quality. It’s not good is it? The result of a cold wet spring and a very wet summer has resulted in the worst harvest in a hundred years. This is just a tiny example here on Kestle Farm that is representative of a much wider problem. Richard Lobb outlines the financial damages to this years harvest here in the transcript:
“Last year (2011) I had 3.5 tons of wheat to the acre. This year (2012) I’ve had under 2 tons of wheat to the acre. I only grow 40 acres of wheat, so I’m a small farm really but if I’m a ton and a half down, 40 acres times a ton and a half equals 60 tons. £200 a ton is what it’s making at the moment so that’s £12,000 gone from my sales just on the wheat crop. 
Then I’ve got another 50 acres of barley which is half a ton down on yield this year compared to last so that’s another 25 tons of corn I haven’t got so that’s another £5,000 lost. That’s just one year to another, all my costs are identical, I’ve sprayed it and planted it, combined it, everything’s just the same it’s just the yield that’s different.”

 

 

We’re having a Photo Competition!

We are looking for some photographs of our beautiful part of Cornwall to print in our 2013 Lobbs Farm Shop Calendar. We would like to invite all our customers to take part and submit a photograph to us before the 12th October 2012

Lobbs Farm Shop will donate £50 for each of the 12 winning photographs to a charity of your choice.

The calendar is given to customers with Christmas orders and are also for suggested donation of £2 each to Mount Edgcumbe Hospice.

There are 3 categories that you can interpret how you wish: 

a) Landscape b) Picnic (using some lovely local produce) c) Cornish Fun!

We will select 12 images for the calendar. Your photo will also be on display in the Countryside Barn from the 13th – 19th October

A few rules for competition entry: 1. Please submit your photo as a print & a JPEG file dropped into Lobbs Farm Shop or posted to the address below. JPEGS can be sent via email if you wish. 2. Please do not send original prints or negatives. 3. Open to amateur & professional photographers. 4. Please make sure any people in the photographs have given their permission for their portrayal in this medium 5. Please submit your photo with a title and where in our area it was taken. 6. Also give your name, address & contact number with your photo

You can submit your entry to lobbsfarmshop@btconnect.com
Or you can post it or drop it into the farm shop on a cd! Our address is Lobbs Farm Shop, Heligan, St Ewe, Cornwall PL26 6PN.

Here’s the map of what we consider to be ‘our patch’! There’s some stunning views to be had in this area, so get out there with your camera and get some cracking shots!

April Showers

There’s been some fairly hefty showers around, laden with raindrops and hail stones. It made for some atmospheric shots one evening last week at Kestle farm. The logo tree field is currently planted with potatoes under those huge furrows. The clear north westerly air provided lovely views north to the clay district, otherwise known as the Cornish Alps! And yes, I did get splattered with chilly rain whilst out in the field…

Hello Spring!

Oh what a beautiful spring day! High cloud gave way to warm hazy sun this afternoon casting a gorgeous light across the land. Here’a few snaps from Kestle Farm from late afternoon, 21st March.

 

Stormy Weather

There’s been some rather large storms lurking about this last week, mostly of hail, sleet and rain. Here’s the view yesterday from Lobb’s Lane which runs between Heligan Gardens and Kestle Farm and takes you down to Heligan Mill & eventually Mevagissey. It’s looking south west across the farm towards Gorran Haven and, yes it was hail! Ouch!

Star Field

Here’s a view across Kestle Farm looking north towards St Austell and the Clay  works. It was taken a day before the full moon so there’s a lot of light on the fields and in the sky, although not enough to bleach out the stars. It was fairly freezing out in the field, but very beautiful. All you could hear was the gentle ‘popping’ of watery mud across the field, there’s been a lot of rain recently!

2012 Calendar

Have you spied our new calendar yet? They arrived from the lovely Nationwide Print just the other day and we’re very pleased with them! You can get your mittens on one of these by placing a butchery order at the farm shop or online www.lobbsfarmshop.com

They feature a selection of photographs from the farm, taken through the changing seasons. We are lucky to live in such an area of natural beauty. Many of the photos were taken by Sal at Design Room. Here are a few sneaky pics from the calendar:

 

November Lambs

Some gorgeous little lambs are now arriving on the farm. Cornwall’s mild climate makes lambing this time of year possible as grass continues to grow through the winter. The lambs can then feed on the pastures and meadows along with the Ewe’s milk. They’re Polled Dorset Horns, a traditional West Country breed that are able to lamb at any time throughout the year as well as having lovely wool.

 

late september sunset

What a gorgeous end to September after quite a blustery stormy month. The mornings here have been shrouded in sea mist before clearing away to reveal a beautiful golden autumn sun. The sunset last night glowed across the horizon, it was a bit like viewing it from an aeroplane, such a vast horizon with a rising band of colour disappearing into a deep blue sky. Stunning. Here’s the view from the ‘Higher Blow the Winds’ field, close to St Ewe village. Enjoy the sunshine!

 

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